Monthly Archives: December, 2011

Share the Light

The Gospel reading today in Morning Prayer is Matthew 25:1-13: Matthew 25 Parable of the ten young bridesmaids 1 “At that time the kingdom of heaven will be like ten young bridesmaids who took their lamps and went out to meet the groom.2 Now five of them were wise, and the other five were foolish.3 The foolish ones …

Read more »

John of the Cross

John of the Cross was another poet in the church that made sainthood.  He  was born into a poor family in 1542 and his father died while he was very young.  He ended up in an orphanage and was raised in the church.  He entered a Jesuit college at 17, and at 21 became a …

Read more »

Abundance

This morning in Common Prayer, we read from a 4th century poet, Ephrem the Syrian. A quote about him- The greatest poet of the patristic age and, perhaps, the only theologian-poet to rank beside Dante.” — Robert Murray (Syriac scholar and Jesuit priest) “The word of God is a tree of life that offers us blessed fruit …

Read more »

Stay alert!

We are deep into the Advent season now on the Church calendar.  My sources for morning prayer continue to focus on the coming of the Christ.  The verse that begins Advent morning prayer from the Book of Common Prayer is this: Therefore, stay alert! You don’t know when the head of the household will come, …

Read more »

Thomas Merton

Today we remember Thomas Merton who died this day in 1968. His biography and writings have inspired a couple of generations of folks in the Church, Protestant, Catholic and Orthodox. Here are a couple of notes: Thomas Merton (1915–1968) Thomas Merton pursued the ideals of pleasure and freedom in early adulthood only to reject them …

Read more »

‘Our’ Father

Cyprian of Carthage, a third-century North African bishop, said, “The Lord Christ did not want us to pray by ourselves in private or for ourselves alone. We do not say ‘My Father, who art in heaven,’ nor ‘Give me this day mydaily bread.’ It is not for oneself alone that each person asks to be forgiven, not to be …

Read more »